Getting rid of risky property play will improve retirement

Situation: Couple has retirement portfolio with high risk investments that could fizzle
Solution: Get out of speculative investments, then invest for reliable income

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Reblogged from Andrew Allentuck

In Alberta, a couple we’ll call Frank, who is 57, and Ella, who is 51, emigrated to Canada decades ago to find work and build secure lives.

Starting with nothing but their will to work, Frank in a municipal civil service job, Ella in health care, they have built up about $705,000 of net worth, most of it in their $490,000 home. They worry, however, that their income from about $184,000 of financial assets plus two civil service pensions at 65 plus CPP and OAS may not be enough to sustain their retirement. The irony is that their Canadian assets would make them very wealthy in their countries of birth. In Canada, though, they worry that their liabilities could sink their retirement.

It is a legitimate concern, for they have a $70,000 line of credit to pay off at $1,200 a month, about 18% of their $6,500 combined monthly take-home pay. The line of credit was taken out to buy into a speculative land development in which they are co-owners of undivided land rather than sole owners of a defined parcel. It is a risky investment that produces no current income. Moreover, they have $37,500 in a mortgage fund in their RRSPs which yields 10% a year. That yield implies the mortgages carry more risk than banks and credit unions accept.

Family Finance asked Derek Moran, head of Smarter Financial Planning Ltd. in Kelowna, B.C., to work with Frank and Ella, who still have a daughter at home attending university.

“The good thing about the couple’s financial affairs is their dedication to their work and their home,” he says. “The not so good thing,” he notes, “is that they appear to have made investments in land and mutual funds on the basis of trust in advice.”

The interest on the loan to buy the property is not tax deductible, though it can be added to the adjusted cost base of the property, eventually reducing the taxable capital gain. Best bet: sell the land to pay off the line of credit and capture a capital gain which the couple believes to be about $30,000 or $20,000 after costs. We’ll assume they just get their money back, then invest in low fee mutual or exchange traded funds focused on producing dividends.

Read More … 596 more words

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