Tax tips for investors: Clearing up real estate confusion

Real estate has been a hot investment area in Canada for quite some time now due to favorable economic conditions, immigration, and historically low interest rates. Canadians who have taken advantage of these conditions are sometimes confused about the measures they can take to reduce their tax burden.

Here are some tax tips addressing several typical areas of confusion:

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Reblogged from Financial Post | Fabiola Campanella

To depreciate or not to depreciate

Depreciation, or for income tax purposes Capital Cost Allowance (CCA) can be an effective way to shelter your real-estate income from current taxes by transferring your obligation to future tax years. CCA works by amortizing a portion of the cost of your rental property against your rental income, generally 4% of your building’s cost on a declining basis year over year.

CCA is an election, meaning that it is the taxpayer’s choice whether or not to use it. The drawback to CCA is that it is recaptured in the year you sell your property, meaning that the historical CCA you’ve taken will be added back on income account to your tax return if you sell the property for anything more than your current un-depreciated capital cost (i.e. the cost of your property less the CCA claimed on prior tax returns.

This recapture can have a negative impact on your taxes in the year of sale so some planning around this election is required. Generally, if you plan on holding the income property for a very long period of time then taking CCA to reduce your rental profits to zero will almost always be advisable.

However, if you plan on selling your property in the near future you should attempt to estimate if your potential recapture will push you into a higher tax bracket, thereby reducing the current effectiveness of the CCA claim. You may also want to consider forfeiting CCA in years where your overall taxable income is low thereby allowing you to claim higher CCA in subsequent years when your marginal tax rate is higher. For more information on CCA see the CRA’s Guide T4036, Rental Income.

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