Recycle, Reduce, Redecorate.

Ikea will buy back your used furniture for store credit, I love this idea!!

Time to handle some obligatory objections…

#1 They’ll only give you pennies on the dollar:
– Of course they will, this is your used furniture we’re talking about!
– Ikea is obviously aiming at those of us who were going to chuck our old furniture in the dumpster. For those of you who were already going to thrift, hand-down or donate – do that! This is not a better or mandatory option – this is just giving consumers more reasons to think before they dump, and maybe even help #maketheworldabetterplace

#2 Now you have to lug your butt (and furniture) all the way back to Ikea:
– Let’s face it, if you were going to toss that old dresser then you were going to have to lug it out of your room and down to the dump. And if you planned to replace it, a trip back to Ikea was already in store for your future. Why not do it and also earn little store credit!

So let’s pass this info along and help our fellow consumer earn a little buck while not completely trashing the planet as we style our homes!

Economic Drivers of Real Estate in Vancouver – DELOITTE

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Real estate market overview and current challenges

October, 2016
Stepping into 2017

Come join me as we learn from Jennifer Podmore-Russell of Deloitte, and her take on where is Vancouver’s real estate marketing heading as we step into 2017. This presentation brought to us courtesy of Wealthminds!

Click here for the full presentation.

I’ve also highlighted below some notable changes in our market which may affect you! Give us a call at (604) 629-7515 or fill out the form below if you’d like to learn more.

Changes in the market – BC’s Foreign Buyer Property Transfer Tax

On July 25, 2016, the BC government introduced legislative changes directed at BC’s residential housing market. The key changes include the introduction of an additional 15% property transfer tax (PTT), effective August 2, 2016, on transfers of residential properties within the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) to foreign entities or taxable trustees

Government Responses – Preventative Measures for a “Healthy, Competitive and Stable Housing Market”

Legislation release on October 3, 2016 included a “Mortgage rate stress test” for all insured borrowers and closing loopholes for the Principal Residence Exemption.

Metro Vancouver home buyers set a record pace in February

Last month was the highest selling February on record for the Metro Vancouver housing market.

Residential property sales in the region totalled 4,172 in February 2016, an increase of 36.3 per cent from the 3,061 sales recorded in February 2015 and an increase of 65.6 per cent compared to January 2016 when 2,519 home sales occurred.

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Last month’s sales were 56.3 per cent above the 10-year sales average for the month and ranks as the highest February sales total on record.

“We’re in a competitive, fast-moving market cycle that favours home sellers,” Darcy McLeod, REBGV president said. “Sustained home buyer competition is keeping upward pressure on home prices across the region.”

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Metro Vancouver totalled 5,812 in February 2016. This represents an increase of 7.1 per cent compared to the 5,425 units listed in February 2015 and a 30.8 per cent increase compared to January 2016 when 4,442 properties were listed.

“We’re beginning to see home listings increase as we head toward the spring market, however, additional supply is still needed to meet today’s demand,” McLeod said.

The total number of properties currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 7,299, a 38.7 per cent decline compared to February 2015 (11,898) and a 10 per cent increase compared to January 2016 (6,635).

The sales-to-active listings ratio for February 2016 is 57.2 per cent. This is indicative of a seller’s market.

Generally, analysts say that downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below the 12 per cent mark, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it reaches the 20 to 22 per cent range in a particular community for a sustained period of time.

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $795,500. This represents a 22.2 per cent increase compared to February 2015.

Sales of detached properties in February 2016 reached 1,778, an increase of 37.2 per cent from the 1,296 detached sales recorded in February 2015. The benchmark price for detached properties increased 27 per cent from February 2015 to $1,305,600.

Sales of apartment properties reached 1,790 in February 2016, an increase of 43.9 per cent compared to the 1,244 sales in February 2015.The benchmark price of an apartment property increased 17.7 per cent from February 2015 to $454,600.

Attached property sales in February 2016 totalled 604, an increase of 15.9 per cent compared to the 521 sales in February 2015. The benchmark price of an attached unit increased 17 per cent from February 2015 to $569,600.

Just Sold! 601 – 111 East 13th

I have just sold this Beautiful Bright unit in a Gorgeous building! Welcome to The Prescott! If you missed this great opportunity, email us on the form below to get in contact today.

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Close to everything, from restaurants and shopping to transit and parks, location can’t be beat! Oversized One Bedroom Unit with High End Finishings and Modern Open Concept living. End Unit, so only has 1 shared wall. Complete with a wonderfully open view of City, Water and Mountains. Come live in the centre of North Van with a View!

 

BCREA Housing Market Update (June 2014)

Questions for Property Transfer Tax (BC)

20140219-224133.jpgIf you are like me, then you probably have tons of questions about Property Transfer Tax. Do I have to pay it? What happens when I sell my house? What if I want to give my house to my children? Are there any rebates, discounts or first-time homebuyer benefits?  I’ve come across a nice article from David Simon – which is quite helpful in some of the odd particulars of Property Transfer Tax, like adding someone’s name to title – does that constitute a sale subject to property transfer tax? I’m by no means an expert nor a lawyer – should you consult your own lawyer if you have a particular situation or question? Yes. If you want to shoot me over a quick question, or get some recommendations on who you should really be speaking to, please hit up the comment section below or on my contact form.

For all you lucky Albertan’s, you’ve probably never encountered nor will you ever hear about this strange thing we call property transfer tax.

“I am often asked how a person can add someone to a title without paying property transfer tax. Usually that person contributed to the acquisition and has been helping paying the mortgage. Unless the person is a “related individual” as defined in the Property Transfer Tax Act and the transferor or the transferee has been living there as his/her principal residence for at least 6 months, then property transfer tax has to be paid. A related individual under the Act is a direct relative, e.g. son, daughter, parent grandparent. Siblings and aunts and uncles do not fall within the definition and the transfer tax has to be paid for transfers to them.

 I have been asked if a company can transfer its property free of property transfer tax to its shareholders. The answer is no as the company is a separate legal entity from its shareholders. Only if the company was holding the property in trust and the trust declaration was registered when the transfer to the company was registered, can the transfer be done free of property transfer tax.

 From an income tax point of view, the law is that on any disposition, or deemed disposition, of capital property, tax is payable on any capital gains. The main exception to this is for dispositions of a primary residence. There is no tax payable on the capital gains from a disposition of a primary residence.  A deemed disposition occurs when a person dies, there is a gift of property or there is a change of use of the property, e g. it goes from being your primary residence to a rental property, or from a rental property to being your primary residence. The gain has to be determined at that time and any applicable tax paid. So before anyone takes title to, or transfers title to, all or part of a primary residence or any other property, even if a family member is involved, they should consult with their tax advisor as to possible tax consequences. Once you do something it is difficult and potentially costly to undo it.”

Bang for your $599,000 buck

There’s a house for sale in Vancouver for under $600,000

Reblogged from The Province

In a city where affordable housing is an oxymoron, a two-storey East Vancouver character home is bound to catch some attention with its price tag.

The 1,951-square-foot home at 2622 Clark Dr. is set to go on the market Monday with a listed price of $599,000 — expected to be the lowest-priced, detached, freehold house in Vancouver.

“I expect it to be noticed,” said listing agent Mary Cleaver. “It’s a beautiful renovated Craftsman-style house in a lovely neighbourhood at a great price.”

The low price is because the three-bedroom, two-bath Grandview-Woodland property faces busy Clark Drive and is on a small 30.5-X-58-foot lot, about half the depth of typical lots in the neighbourhood.

Contrary to what some people might expect from the — relatively — bargain-basement price, the house is well-kept and lovingly maintained.

Built in 1911, its plumbing, electrical and windows were updated before the current owners bought the place in 2005 for $333,000. They have since replaced the roof, refinished the floors, installed a new kitchen and repainted the exterior, said Cleaver.

Homeowner Simon Yu, who owns a deck-renovation company, also added a wraparound deck to the home, adding an extra 600 sq. ft to the property.

The low price is rare in the city, said Cleaver, although it isn’t the only one. In January, a house in the Fraserview-Killarney neighbourhood sold for $592,000. A house off of Commercial Drive sold for $471,000 in April 2012.

Currently, the cheapest freehold, detached house listed in Vancouver is $628,000 in Hastings-Sunrise.

The Clark Drive house may be a deal in comparison with million-dollar fixer-uppers that have become the norm in the city, but statistics show Vancouver’s housing market still remains out of reach for average wage earners. An RBC report last year shows detached homes in Metro Vancouver require more than 80 per cent of median household income. A recent international survey also placed Vancouver second after Hong Kong in having the least-affordable housing.

And there are no signs Vancouver’s sky-high market is heading for a downturn. The region’s housing market is maintaining its steady pace from last year, said the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver, with residential sales in February jumping 40 per cent compared with February 2013.

Cleaver said the homeowners, who have two young children, were very happy in the house, but are selling it because they need more space. She’s holding an open house April 5 and 6 from 2 to 4 p.m.

“It’s a very nice, livable house, and (at that price), it is competing with apartments and townhouses,” she said.

What $599,000 will get you:

If you want even more bang for your buck, you have to look farther afield. Here is what $599,000 will get you in:

Langley: 20465-67B Ave.

A 3,248-square-foot, five-bedroom, four-bathroom house in Willoughby with gourmet kitchen and finished basement.

Maple Ridge: 10070-246B St.

Built in 2013, this four-bedroom home on a quiet street has a great room, vaulted ceilings in the master bedroom and a rec room.

Sechelt: 6220 Mika Rd.

There are panoramic sea views, oversized decks and 14-foot ceilings in this five-bedoom West Sechelt home on a 11,412-sq.-ft lot.

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Vancouver home sales jump 30% in January from a year ago, board warns people to ‘price’ home right

The message from realtors in Canada’s most expensive city is clear — price your home right if you want it to sell.

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Reblogged from The Financial Post | Gary Marr

The message from realtors in Canada’s most expensive city is clear — price your home right if you want it to sell.

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver said there were 1,760 sales through the Multiple Listing Service in January, a 30.3% increase from a year ago. But sales were down 9.9% decline from December.

The board’s president had a specific message to homeowners, in a press release.

“If you’re looking to sell your home in a balanced market, it’s critical that your list price is reflective of current market conditions,” said Sandra Ms. Wyatt.

Last month’s sales figures remain 7.2% above the 10-year average for the month of January. Prices have inched up a bit too. The board’s composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver stood at $606,800 last month, a 3.2% increase from a year ago.

“The Greater Vancouver housing market has been in a balanced market for nearly a year. This has meant steady home sale and listing activity accompanied by stable home prices,” said Ms. Wyant, in the release.

New listings are on the rise, reaching 5,128 in January. That’s a 4.2% increase from a year ago. New listings were also 17.7% above the 10-year average for the month.

The new listings bring the total number of properties for sale across the Greater Vancouver area to 12,602 which is down 4.9% from a year ago but up 9% from December.

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Why some homes struggle to sell (as illustrated by Legos)

Daniel Langevin

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Well the other issue is the design. This house can’t decide if it’s a castle or contemporary home. The right buyer will love it, but so far that buyer hasn’t shown up.

Enjoy this clever lego illustration of why some homes struggle to sell, by Sacramento appraiser Ryan Lundquist & sons!

Reblogged from Sacramento Real Estate Blog

Some houses simply struggle to sell. They sit on the market week after week and month after month with no bites. Here is an example of one house that has done just that. Take the lessons here for what they’re worth.  🙂

Read 76 more words here

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Five things to do if you are over-extended on your mortgage

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Reblogged from Financial Post, Andrew Allentuck

Mortgage default may be rare in this country, but nearly 9% of indebted households need 40% or more of their gross income to pay their debt service charges, says the Bank of Canada Financial System Review.

If you can see problems coming, then you can take action to avoid foreclosure, which happens when lenders run out of other alternatives and borrowers can do no more to pay their debts. Here are five options to consider when you are being crushed by mortgage payments:

1. Extend amortization: If the mortgage has been paid down to 10 or 15 years, then extending it to 20 to 25 years or even to 30 years will decrease payments. In a lot of cases this will work, says Elena Jara, director of education for Credit Canada Solutions, a Toronto-based non-profit organization which offers free credit counselling.

2. Seek better terms: You can go for lower interest rates with the same or a different lender but with a potential penalty, says Bill Evans, a mortgage broker with Mortgage Architects in Winnipeg.“If you are having trouble with payments with one lender, another may not want to take you on. But if you can present a case for a new income, you can go to a so-called specialty lender such as Home Trust or Optimum Trust for a fresh look at your problem and potential solutions,” Evans says. “If you just want to alleviate the problem, timing is crucial.”

3. Renew at a floating rate: There is more risk but lower interest cost in floating rate mortgages. If you are on a fixed rate mortgage with relatively high rates and want to go to a lower floating rate, perhaps by taking the mortgage to another lender, then there may be relief when it is time for loan renewal. The present lender may add a penalty, but over time, floating rates and the often attractive rate on a one-year closed loan can offer relief, Mr. Evans says.

4. Sell it and rent: In markets with high home prices as a result of speculative building, absentee owners will often rent at relatively low cost. That makes for good deals for renters.

5. Discuss a consumer proposal
The homeowner can avoid outright bankruptcy and foreclosure of the home by talking to creditors, suggests Bruce Caplan, trustee in bankruptcy for BDO Canada Ltd. in Winnipeg. “The homeowner can make a consumer proposal in which a settlement plan is devised for the creditors. Secured creditors such as the banks or private mortgage lenders can work out new terms such as reduced payments or a payment bridge for a period of time with the homeowner,” he suggests.

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