Economic Drivers of Real Estate in Vancouver – DELOITTE

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Real estate market overview and current challenges

October, 2016
Stepping into 2017

Come join me as we learn from Jennifer Podmore-Russell of Deloitte, and her take on where is Vancouver’s real estate marketing heading as we step into 2017. This presentation brought to us courtesy of Wealthminds!

Click here for the full presentation.

I’ve also highlighted below some notable changes in our market which may affect you! Give us a call at (604) 629-7515 or fill out the form below if you’d like to learn more.

Changes in the market – BC’s Foreign Buyer Property Transfer Tax

On July 25, 2016, the BC government introduced legislative changes directed at BC’s residential housing market. The key changes include the introduction of an additional 15% property transfer tax (PTT), effective August 2, 2016, on transfers of residential properties within the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) to foreign entities or taxable trustees

Government Responses – Preventative Measures for a “Healthy, Competitive and Stable Housing Market”

Legislation release on October 3, 2016 included a “Mortgage rate stress test” for all insured borrowers and closing loopholes for the Principal Residence Exemption.

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BC’s New PTT (Property Transfer Tax)

The new rules on BC’s Property Transfer Tax have been released with the potential to save up to $13,000 for some, and rate increases for others. The goal of the province’s 2016 budget to help put home ownership within the reach of more people, but you can weigh in – does BC’s New PTT achieve its stated goals?

Highlights

  • Exemption for buyers of new homes that priced at up to $750,000;
  • PTT increase to 3% from 2% for properties valued at more than $2 million;
  • Requirement that property buyers self-report their nationality when they register their property.

Let’s go back and recognize the PTT as a major source of BC’s revenue, Vancouver accounting for nearly one-quarter of the government’s $1.15-billion windfall from B.C.’s property transfer tax in the past fiscal year.

The property transfer tax was introduced in 1987 as a “luxury tax,” however thresholds have not changed since then, meaning it has turned into a revenue generator for the province.

Questions for Property Transfer Tax (BC)

20140219-224133.jpgIf you are like me, then you probably have tons of questions about Property Transfer Tax. Do I have to pay it? What happens when I sell my house? What if I want to give my house to my children? Are there any rebates, discounts or first-time homebuyer benefits?  I’ve come across a nice article from David Simon – which is quite helpful in some of the odd particulars of Property Transfer Tax, like adding someone’s name to title – does that constitute a sale subject to property transfer tax? I’m by no means an expert nor a lawyer – should you consult your own lawyer if you have a particular situation or question? Yes. If you want to shoot me over a quick question, or get some recommendations on who you should really be speaking to, please hit up the comment section below or on my contact form.

For all you lucky Albertan’s, you’ve probably never encountered nor will you ever hear about this strange thing we call property transfer tax.

“I am often asked how a person can add someone to a title without paying property transfer tax. Usually that person contributed to the acquisition and has been helping paying the mortgage. Unless the person is a “related individual” as defined in the Property Transfer Tax Act and the transferor or the transferee has been living there as his/her principal residence for at least 6 months, then property transfer tax has to be paid. A related individual under the Act is a direct relative, e.g. son, daughter, parent grandparent. Siblings and aunts and uncles do not fall within the definition and the transfer tax has to be paid for transfers to them.

 I have been asked if a company can transfer its property free of property transfer tax to its shareholders. The answer is no as the company is a separate legal entity from its shareholders. Only if the company was holding the property in trust and the trust declaration was registered when the transfer to the company was registered, can the transfer be done free of property transfer tax.

 From an income tax point of view, the law is that on any disposition, or deemed disposition, of capital property, tax is payable on any capital gains. The main exception to this is for dispositions of a primary residence. There is no tax payable on the capital gains from a disposition of a primary residence.  A deemed disposition occurs when a person dies, there is a gift of property or there is a change of use of the property, e g. it goes from being your primary residence to a rental property, or from a rental property to being your primary residence. The gain has to be determined at that time and any applicable tax paid. So before anyone takes title to, or transfers title to, all or part of a primary residence or any other property, even if a family member is involved, they should consult with their tax advisor as to possible tax consequences. Once you do something it is difficult and potentially costly to undo it.”

2014 Changes to BC’s Property Transfer Tax

Good afternoon,

In case you have missed it, the provincial government recently announced changes to the exemption limits for the First Time Home Buyer exemption.

Prior to the change, the First Time Home Buyer Exemption was capped in the Lower Mainland at $425,000.00 and there was a sliding scale between $425,000.00 and $450,000.00. The new cap effective Feb. 19, 2014 is $475,000.00 and there is a sliding scale between $475,000.00 and $500,000.00.

Related links:
http://helpreducetheptt.ca
Government of BC – Property Transfer Tax

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